Three Guidelines for Great Photographs

Three Guidelines for Great Photographs

Three Guidelines for Great Photographs

Sometimes it can be intimidating to approach a busy scene and take the first measurements of the composition to develop a clear and convincing photograph. If you feel overwhelmed by something that is about to fire and you do not know exactly how to cope, try to remember the three NYIP guidelines for great photographs:

A good picture has a clear theme – Each image creates worries whether it is someone or something. Try to tell a story about a topic or convey the particular mood of a landscape of something symbolic in it? Anyway, the one you see in the picture you create should immediately see the person or thing you are trying to tell a story. This must be clear and unequivocal.
A good picture focuses on the subject. Once you have established a topic or topic, then mark the items surrounding it so that the viewer will not be confused or unsure of what they see. Try to make a scene that immediately attracts the attention of the viewer on the subject.
A good photography simplifies – Simplification is the key to developing an image that tells a story. A good picture should include additional elements that contribute to the story and improve the background theme and should not take any outside noise that adds nothing to the subject of additional narrative.

If you try to apply the principles of the three guidelines to your composing process, you will see an immediate change in the way you experience photography, especially when you do not know how to get started. If you ever get stuck in the future, look at the image you are going to do and you represent the following three elements:

What do you want this picture to be?
How can I draw attention to my subject and attract the attention of the viewer?
Have not I simplified? Have not I included only what attracts attention to me? Have I eliminated anything that is not essential or a distraction?
Once you have answered these questions and adapted accordingly, you are ready to click on the shutter.

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