Democratic Schools

 

Democratic Schools

Imagine a school where children and adolescents enjoy all the rights and responsibilities of democratic citizenship; Where students actually practice reading-only place, principles of freedom of expression, free association and freedom to choose their own activities; Where students vote on the rules that affect and participate in juries to try people accused of violating the rules. What better training than that to prepare students for democratic citizenship? Many people are skeptical that a school could work. They wonder if children and adolescents, taking into account that power, make reasonable decisions, either for the school or for themselves as individuals. However, there are many schools of this type, and all reasonable measures, which have been effective. Some of them have existed for decades, and serve students as young as four during their teens. These schools have produced hundreds of graduates, who switched to success in all environments. Read on to learn more about how democratic schools operate, see evidence of their educational effectiveness, and find a partial list of schools in North America. How to make democratic schools a democratic school, as the term is used on this site, is a school where students are entrusted to take responsibility for their own life and learning and for the school community. In such a school, students choose their own activities and partners with whom they want. If classes are offered, students are always free to take it or not. Most of these schools accept students in a wide range of ages (usually four years to the end of adolescence) and make students not separated by age, so students can learn to interact with others who are older And younger than them. “It will take a radical change to obtain a learning system adapted to a democracy.” It must be recognized that in a democracy, learning restriction means indoctrination and learning through The invitation and choice is education. “Roland Meighan’s staff members from a democratic school are there to help, not directly. Are the adult members of the school community. They bring their experiences to the community, their wisdom, and their long-term commitment to the school and its students. In some democratic schools, staff are hired and dismissed for a procedure in which each student and staff member has one vote, so that those who do not meet the students’ needs can be sent back. Teach staff members in the broad sense, but not qua lifient generally not “teachers”, because it is recognized that students learn as much about themselves, play, explore, socialize and work together as they are adults. Democratic schools are democratically governed, usually at weekly school meetings each student and staff member has one vote. School meeting in general, regulates all rules of conduct in the school and establish procedures to implement them, usually involve a jury of school members of all ages. In short, a democratic school has a democratically governed framework for self-directed learning, in which students have the advantage of a mixed community of friends and colleagues with whom and for whom learning.

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